又一女子指控参议员候选人莫尔有不当性行为

编辑:给力英语新闻 更新:2017年11月14日 作者:美国之音(VOA News)

比佛利·扬·尼尔森(左)在律师陪同下哭着对媒体宣读声明,指称阿拉巴马州共和党联邦参议员候选人罗伊·莫尔当年曾对她有不当性行为。(2017年11月13日)
比佛利·扬·尼尔森(左)在律师陪同下哭着对媒体宣读声明,指称阿拉巴马州共和党联邦参议员候选人罗伊·莫尔当年曾对她有不当性行为。(2017年11月13日)Beverly Young Nelson, left, reacts as she reads a statement to reporters with attorney Gloria Allred during a news conference announcing new allegations of sexual misconduct against Alabama Republican congressional candidate Roy Moore, in New York, Nov. 13, 2017.

星期一,又有一名女子指责阿拉巴马州共和党联邦参议员候选人罗伊·莫尔在违背她的意愿的情况下做出性动作。而在此之前几个小时,国会参议院首席共和党议员、参议院多数党领袖米奇·麦康奈尔说,莫尔应当退选。

最新的控告人比佛利·扬·尼尔森在纽约举行的记者会上哭诉说,在1970年代末,莫尔在自己的汽车里攻击了她,当时她是16岁的学生,在他经常光顾的阿拉巴马州加兹登的一家餐馆打工。她指责莫尔抓摸她,摸了她的胸,还按着她的头压向莫尔的裆部,随后,她不是跌出车外,就是被推出车外。

就在尼尔森举行记者会之前,莫尔声称对他的最新指称是捕风捉影的政治陷害。他还说,他“从来没有跟任何人有任何不当性行为”,他“将寻求所有的法律选项反击这些不实之词。”

在尼尔森提出指控的四天前,《华盛顿邮报》发表了一则长篇报道。在这篇报道中,现年50多岁的莉·考夫曼指称,莫尔1979年在违背她的意愿的情况下对她做出性动作。当时她只有14岁,莫尔则是32岁的地方检察官。还有三名女性回忆说,在同一时期,莫尔也追求过她们,当时她们都只有十几岁,而莫尔比她们大了十多岁。

在尼尔森提出最新的指称之前,参议院多数党领袖麦康奈尔说,莫尔应当退选。

麦康奈尔之前曾说,如果指称被证明属实,莫尔应当退选。如今麦康奈尔说,他相信莉·考夫曼和另外三名女子的说法。

麦康奈尔在路易斯维尔对记者说:“我认为他应当退出。”

麦康奈尔说,共和党人可以尝试通过在选票上临时写入候选人的方式赢得12月12日的特别选举。候选人有可能是路德·斯特兰奇参议员。他在杰夫·塞申斯出任司法部长后被州长任命为代表本州的联邦参议员,但在9月末的党内初选中败给莫尔。

不过,在选票上临时写入候选人的办法也不是那么容易。莫尔的名字已经印在供缺席选民使用的选票上了,另外,候选人退选的最后期限也早已过去。

莫尔今年70岁。他的竞选阵营很快在推特上发声,对麦康奈尔的说法做出反击说,退出的人应当是麦康奈尔,“他辜负了保守派人士,必须被替换”。

莫尔经常嘲讽麦康奈尔作为参议院多数党领袖的表现,而且拒绝接受其他共和党名人要他退选的呼吁。

莫尔星期日对政治支持者们说,《华盛顿邮报》的那篇报道是“假新闻”,是“企图让我的政治竞选停下来的绝望企图”。他说,他要告这家报纸。

莫尔的民主党对手是前联邦检察官道格·琼斯。在南方州阿拉巴马,联邦和州级选举的赢家一般都是共和党人。在报纸爆料和莫尔坚决否认之后立即进行的四项民调显示,莫尔与琼斯距离接近,只差几个百分点,目前有很多选民举棋不定。

Another Woman Accuses Alabama's Roy Moore of Unwanted Sexual Advances

Another woman on Monday accused Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore of an unwanted sexual advances, just hours after the top Republican in the U.S. Senate said Moore should end his candidacy.

In the newest case, Beverly Young Nelson cried at a New York news conference as she alleged that Moore assaulted her in his car in the late 1970s when she was a 16-year-old student working at a restaurant that he frequented in Gadsden, Alabama. She accused Moore of groping her, touching her breasts and pushing her head toward his crotch before she fell or was pushed out of the car.

Shortly before her news conference, Moore said the latest allegations against him are a "witch hunt" and said he "has never had any sexual misconduct with anyone." He said he "will pursue all legal options against these false claims."

Nelson's accusations came four days after The Washington Post published a lengthy account in which a woman, Leigh Corfman, now in her 50s, alleged that Moore made an unwanted sexual advance on her in 1979 when she was 14 and he was a 32-year-old local prosecutor. Three other women recalled that about the same time Moore pursued them when they were teenagers and he was more than a decade older.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, speaking before Nelson made her allegations, said that Moore should quit his Senate campaign.

McConnell previously said Moore should end his candidacy if the allegations were proven true. But now McConnell said he believes Corfman's account of her encounter with Moore and that of the three other women quoted in the Post's account.

"I think he should step aside," McConnell told reporters in Louisville.

McConnell said Republicans could attempt to win the December 12 special election with a write-in candidate, possibly Senator Luther Strange, the appointed lawmaker whom Moore defeated for the party's Senate nomination in a primary election in late September.

But a write-in candidacy would be complicated by the fact that Moore's name has already been printed on absentee voter ballots and the deadline for withdrawal from the race has long since passed. Senator Cory Gardner, another Republican, said that if Moore wins the election, the Senate should vote to expel him because he does not meet the chamber's "ethical and moral requirements."

Shortly after McConnell's remarks, the campaign of the 70-year-old Moore said on Twitter that "the person who should step aside" is McConnell, adding, "He has failed conservatives and must be replaced."

Moore has routinely ridiculed McConnell's performance as the Senate Republican leader and had already rebuffed calls from other prominent Republicans to drop out of the race.

Moore told political supporters Sunday that last week's Post report was "fake news" and "a desperate attempt to stop my political campaign." He said the newspaper "will be sued."

His contest against Democrat Doug Jones, a former federal prosecutor, is to fill out the last three years of the seat once held by Jeff Sessions, now attorney general in President Donald Trump's Cabinet.

He told the political rally that "there are groups that don't want me in the United States Senate," naming the Democratic Party and establishment Republican officials in Washington. He accused them of working together to derail his campaign, but said, "We do not plan to let anybody deter us from this race."

The White House has said Moore should end his candidacy if the charges are proven to be true, a stance adopted by other key Republicans, including most Republican senators.

White House legislative aide Marc Short said Sunday, "I think there's a special place in hell for those who actually perpetrate these crimes. But, having said that, he hasn't been proved guilty. We have to afford him the chance to defend himself."

Aside from McConnell, other Republicans, including Senator Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania and two former Republican presidential candidates, Mitt Romney and Senator John McCain of Arizona, have called for Moore to end his candidacy or revoked their past endorsements.

Moore has tried to raise money off the controversy, telling potential donors that "vicious and sleazy attacks against me are growing more vicious by the minute."

He said, "I'm counting on you to stand with me at this critical moment by chipping in a donation to help me bust through the vicious lies and attacks and get the truth out to as many voters as possible before December 12."

Four surveys of voters taken in Alabama, a southern state, in the immediate aftermath of the newspaper story and Moore's adamant rejection of it show him to be in a close race with Jones, separated by a few percentage points, with a significant share of undecided voters.